ashland.news
July 14, 2024

Ashland dog walkers report aggressive behavior by deer toward dogs

A doe and three fawns cautiously cross an Ashland street in August 2022. Black-tailed does raising fawns will protect them against people, dogs and other perceived threats. Ashland.news photo by Bert Etling
June 24, 2024

ODFW urges dog-walkers to stay vigilant through fawning season

By Emma Coke, Ashland.news

Numerous calls are coming in about deer showing aggressive behavior to people — especially people walking their dogs — in Ashland and the surrounding area, the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife reports.

On June 11, a deer followed a woman walking her dog and then pawed at the dog until she moved away. Six other cases have been reported in Ashland, with deer following, charging after or stomping at people walking their dogs. 

“(A deer) started stalking my dog and I so we went back home,” according to a June 23 report of an encounter on Ray Lane south of Ashland Street. “Left min later and the same deer was waiting for us behind a tree. Began stalking us again until I chased it off with a large stick in hand.”

Deer profiles mark the locations of reports of aggressive deer in Ashland in the last month. Bears icons mark locations of bear sightings. Screen capture from Ashland Wildlife Reporter webpage

“Aggressive dear, try to attack a dog, the woman was walking on a leash,” reads a June 18 report of an incident on East Main Street near Ashland Fire & Rescue Station No. 1. “She threw something at it, it cross the street, but then came back and try to get into attack. She threw something again and was able to get away.”

The ODFW recommends dog owners avoid walking their dogs for a few weeks in areas where aggressive deer have been reported. To check where aggressive deer have been reported, visit the Ashland Wildlife Reporter webpage. 

More info
To go to the Ashland Wildlife Reporter webpage, click here 
To go to the ODFW Living with Wildlife webpage, click here

Other recommendations by ODFW include staying vigilant when walking and keeping dogs on short leashes. If a deer or fawn is spotted, ODFW says to keep your distance – don’t approach the animal.

During summer in the Rogue Valley, black-tailed does are raising their fawns and will protect them against dogs, people or other perceived threats, said Megan Dugan, public information officer for ODFW.  

According to the ODFW, deer aren’t normally aggressive animals, however, does may become aggressive if they perceive threats to their fawn. Often this occurs when people and pets approach them, getting too close to the animals, Dugan said. 

“This issue of does being aggressive in protecting their fawns is a natural behavior,” Dugan said.

This aggressive behavior can go on throughout the summer months, according to Dugan, as deer give birth through July. 

To report any aggressive deer behavior, call the ODFW’s Central Point office by calling 541-826-8774. Aggressive deer incidents can also be submitted to the Ashland Wildlife Reporter.

Email Ashland.news reporter intern Emma Coke at emmasuecoke@gmail.com.

Related stories:

Mayor answers questions about water rate hikes, deer attacks (Jan. 28, 2024)

‘These deer are not Bambi’: Aggressive doe kills dog in Ashland (June 23, 2023)

Aggressive deer reported in Ashland and other areas of Jackson, Josephine counties (July 23, 2022)

Picture of Bert Etling

Bert Etling

Bert Etling is the executive editor of Ashland.news. Email him at betling@ashland.news.

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