Empty Bowls returns as an in-person fundraiser Friday

Empty Bowl dinners sup on simple meals while attendees browse local potters' creations at a past Empty Bowls fundraiser. Proceeds help feed the hungry. Peace House photo
October 16, 2022

Filling bowls one evening will fill bellies year round

Empty Bowls is back as a community celebration as well as a fundraiser after two years of COVID-19 interruption. It will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, in Wesley Hall at First United Methodist Church, 175 N. Main St., Ashland.

“In 2020 and 2021, we delivered bowls to the homes of ticket purchasers,” said Herbert Rothschild, event chair. “That was Pam Marsh’s idea, and it was a good one, because just as she predicted, people were eager to help out in hard times. We raised money, but we lost the sense of celebration. I missed that.”

Empty Bowls raises money for local nonprofit organizations that address food insecurity in Ashland. This year proceeds will be shared among Uncle Foods Diner, Food Angels and the Southern Oregon Jobs with Justice free meals program. Peace House, which runs Uncle Foods Diner, is organizer of the event.

Here’s how the event works. For $25, attendees pick out a bowl made by area potters and take it to the soup line, where it’s filled with soup donated by local restaurants and served by prominent members of the community.

Tickets may be purchased online at peacehouse.net or at the door on the evening of the event.

From left, celebrity Empty Bowl soup servers Circuit Court Judge Benjamin Bloom, Peace House Executive Director Elizabeth Hallett, former state Sen. Alan DeBoer and Ashland Police Chief Tighe O’Meara get ready to serve fundraiser guests at a prior year’s event. Peace House photo

Servers this year are Ashland City Council members Gina DuQuenne, Tonya Graham, Stephen Jensen and Stefani Seffinger, Oregon circuit judges Benjamin Bloom and Joe Charter, Oregon State Sen. Jeff Golden, Oregon State Rep. Pam Marsh, Ashland Chief of Police Tighe O’Meara, Ashland.news Executive Editor Bert Etling, and Ashland civic leaders Kathryn and Barry Thalden.

Among the restaurants donating soups this year are Greenleaf, Simple Café and C St Bistro in Jacksonville. Freshly baked bread is being donated by Philippe the Baker and several Ashland bakeries. Cookies are again being made and donated by the women of the K1P1 Knitting Club.

Peace House is especially indebted to generous sponsors T.C. Chevy, The Haines Philanthropic Foundation, and The Earth and Humanity Foundation. It is also indebted to the members of Clayfolk, who threw the bowls and contributed other kinds of ceramics. Those mugs, serving platters and vases will be displayed for sale during the event.

“We continue to see our numbers go up,” said Kerul Dyer, director of Uncle Food’s Diner, which has been feeding Ashland’s poorest and unhoused residents for 30 years. “We rely on the support of our neighbors to meet the challenge, and Empty Bowls brings people together to do just that.” 

For more information about Empty Bowls, email info@peacehouse.net or call 541-482-9625.

Email Ashland.news Executive Editor Bert Etling at betling@ashland.news or call or text him at 541-631-1313.

Share this article

Bert Etling

Bert Etling

Bert Etling is the executive editor of Ashland.news. Email him at betling@ashland.news.


Latest posts

Newcomer Hansen embraces pragmatic agenda for council

Local businessman Eric Hansen wants to lead with a pragmatic approach when sworn into the Ashland City Council in January. He campaigned on a platform of economic and ecological sustainability and vitality but, for starters, suggests starting council meetings at 4 p.m.

Read More >

Inner Peace: Retirement as a road to inner peace

Victoria Leo: ‘If you think that you are the career, and you feel the power over your life choices that getting those monthly earnings gives you in a market economy, the future generates fear, and fear is not conducive to inner peace.’

Read More >

Relocations: The heartbreaking futility of still another Blitz

Herbert Rothschild: “It’s hard to dismiss spite as a motive for aerial assaults on civilian targets unassociated with ground offenses against them. That’s especially true because retrospective studies of such assaults during World War II revealed that they do little to impede fighting capacity and, if anything, strengthen the popular will to carry on.”

Read More >

Explore More...

Newcomer Hansen embraces pragmatic agenda for council

Local businessman Eric Hansen wants to lead with a pragmatic approach when sworn into the Ashland City Council in January. He campaigned on a platform of economic and ecological sustainability and vitality but, for starters, suggests starting council meetings at 4 p.m.

Read More>

Inner Peace: Retirement as a road to inner peace

Victoria Leo: ‘If you think that you are the career, and you feel the power over your life choices that getting those monthly earnings gives you in a market economy, the future generates fear, and fear is not conducive to inner peace.’

Read More>
ashland.news logo

Subscribe to the newsletter and get local news sent directly to your inbox.

(It’s free)