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July 24, 2024

Inner Peace: Beyond the ego

Inner Peace
Photo by Johannes Plenio for Pixabay
November 23, 2023

In the end, do we you want to be remembered for the physical self you presented to the world or for something deeper, your soul?

By Jim Hatton

I have had the privilege of facilitating many “Celebration of Life” services. With that comes the obligation and privilege of comforting and consoling the family and friends of the deceased.

Jim Hatton
Jim Hatton

I have learned, through this process, so many different viewpoints on what happens beyond this physical life experience. This is commonly called the “afterlife,” the life beyond the physical life. I prefer to simply call it the nonphysical. There are many opinions, ideas, and beliefs about what the afterlife actually is.

This gives rise to the question of not only what the experience of the afterlife is, but how we are known in the afterlife. Who are we really? In this physical life, we are known and remembered by:

Our name.

Our gender.

Our actions.

Our profession.

Our activities and hobbies.

Our religion.

How many “Likes” or “Friends” we have on Facebook.

Our shortcomings.

Our deeds (good or otherwise).

And many other things and attributes.

All that is listed above may be what we remember ourselves to be, and that is what makes up the ego. I like the term the “Ego-encapsulated self.” But none of what is listed above is based in or relevant in the nonphysical.

What we are remembered for at the end of this lifetime is almost always based on appearances and actions in the physical. If we were not remembered for all these physically based remembrances, what would we be remembered for? In other words, what/who are we that exists in the physical and continues on beyond the physical realm?

In my celebration of life services, I like those present to recall a few of the physical attributes and actions of the person we are celebrating and verbally list them for the attendees. Then I say “but that is not what we loved about him//her.” When I ask what is it that we loved about “John” or “Debbie,” almost without exception, what people love and remember about a person is not what they did for a living or what religion they identified with or how much money they made. What they remember is the essence of the person when they were with them. It’s what they felt and knew intuitively about the person they loved. This is what we are, this is what people love about each other. Some refer to this as our soul or consciousness.

We live in a physical world, and we need to deal and enjoy the physical items and attributes of our world. But if we are remembered truly for our consciousness, do we really want to spend the majority of our efforts and attention just to the physical? Or do we want to give more energy and attention to spiritual learning and expanding our consciousness so that when we leave this physical experience behind, we can live a fuller expression when we move back into the nonphysical or to the afterlife. In doing so, it just may be that our life experience here in the physical world is enhanced and more fulfilled.

I invite you to explore and know more of who you truly are. You just may find that your physical life becomes more than you expected.

The World is not broken, Be in Peace…

Jim Hatton is an author, spiritual teacher and speaker. He makes his home in the Rogue Valley, Southern Oregon. Contact him at jim@jimhatton.com.

Want to contribute? Send 600- to 700-word articles on all aspects of inner peace to Richard Carey (rcarey009@gmail.com).

Picture of Jim

Jim

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