ashland.news
July 14, 2024

Letter: Just learn to live with the deer

July 2, 2024

Regarding the June 26 Viewpoint about Ashland’s deer population: At first I thought the article was satirical due to the extensive use of modifiers such as “destructive, ”sickly,” “threatening,” “weak,” etc. Oh please, they’re just deer. But the bombastic negativity continued throughout the article, so I have an opinion to share in return.

Keeping deer out of Ashland is inconceivable. Wild lands reach from Ashland to the Pacific coast, from Ashland to the Arctic Circle, from Ashland to the Rocky Mountain front, and from Ashland to Mexico and beyond. All of those wild lands are deer habitat, and deer roam throughout. Deer in Ashland are inevitable.

Besides, how will you feel when a doe and fawn are killed to save your plants from nibbling? How about we learn to appreciate and live with wildlife? It’s not always easy, but it can bring you peace.

Nonetheless, I do think the population of agenda-driven lawyers might be getting out of hand.

Daniel Cooke

Ashland

Picture of Jim

Jim

Related Posts...

Latest posts

‘Telling the American narrative’: SOU to conduct archaeological investigations of historic eastern Oregon logging town this fall

With a newly funded $20,000 grant from the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office, some Southern Oregon University’s Sociology and Anthropology Program students and staff will travel to eastern Oregon this fall to perform archaeological excavations for a logging ghost town that once was home to a diverse community in the early 20th century, including African-American and white loggers.

Read More >

Explore More...

As fall approaches, the Ashland Independent Film Festival volunteers and coordinators prepare for the festival's triumphant return to the Rogue Valley. With a new executive director, the festival is set to involve plenty of new ideas, events and programs while maintaining the classic film festival experience.
With a newly funded $20,000 grant from the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office, some Southern Oregon University’s Sociology and Anthropology Program students and staff will travel to eastern Oregon this fall to perform archaeological excavations for a logging ghost town that once was home to a diverse community in the early 20th century, including African-American and white loggers.
“Don’t let your inability to do everything stop you from doing one thing. And reckoning with racial injustice in the United States is a big task.” That was what Taylor Stewart, Oregon Remembrance Project founder, said in the Ashland Sunrise Project’s latest talk, “Uncovering Difficult Truths.”
A crossword about local news sources. Solve it directly in the article or download a PDF to print. More crosswords under the Culture menu.
The Siskiyou Crest Coalition is hosting a fundraiser Saturday afternoon, July 13, at a private conserved property on the slopes of Mount Ashland owned by Mark Newberger. A butterfly species list is being compiled for the property, which will be the subject of an upcoming article in the North American Butterfly Association magazine and will be a nominee for NABA butterfly garden of the year. 
ashland.news logo

Subscribe to the newsletter and get local news sent directly to your inbox.

(It’s free)

Don't Miss Our Top Stories

Get our newsletter delivered to your inbox three times a week.
It’s FREE and you can cancel anytime.