Letter: ‘Why can we no longer jump on a train?’

May 6, 2022

How wonderful it would be to be able to hop on a train and travel to Portland or San Francisco. How can it be that in this time of too many cars on the road, climate concerns, and a host of other reasons, which would include convenience and safety — why, why, why can we no longer jump on a train?

I was involved with a group several years ago trying to figure out why this apparently “can’t” happen. Money, of course. It was because although the train tracks are there — they are not up to the standards for passenger trains.

It just seems like a win-win deal to have trains running once more. We can celebrate that the “Connections” were made and thank those who made it so — but we would honor their efforts even more by making it accessible to passengers once again.

Why is this not a plan? We know it is possible — but apparently not profitable — so it may never happen in my lifetime. Or ever. Or will it?

What do you think?

Annette Baker

Ashland

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Bert Etling

Bert Etling

Bert Etling is the executive editor of Ashland.news. Email him at betling@ashland.news.

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