ashland.news
July 14, 2024

Viewpoint: Protect homeowners and pets, not destructive deer

A doe and two fawns graze near Palmer Road in Ashland in July 2022. Ashland.news photo by Holly Dillemuth
June 26, 2024

City policy safeguards Ashland’s destructive deer, which don’t just go after dogs; they take out tens of thousands of dollars in landscaping

By Conde Cox

Our community should address the negative impact that our city policies to protect our destructive urban deer population are imposing on all of us. 

Not only are these sickly non-wild deer a physical threat to our household pets, as Ashland.news recently reported, but also these deer also destroy tens of thousands of dollars worth of landscaping in our city every year. Indeed, many local citizens are forced to put up large unattractive fencing around their yards, solely to keep these destructive deer off of their landscaping.

Not wild

We are not dealing here with wild animals these deer in our town are in fact obviously sickly, sometimes aggressive and often destructive. They would not last five minutes in a true wilderness environment precisely because they are sick, not wilderness creatures, and are unable to defend for themselves except when attacking our pets and our residential landscaping.

These deer are protected by our local law enforcement from harvesting and from relocation. I know this because when I called the city to ask (sarcastically) who was going to reimburse me for the thousands of dollars in vet bills that I incurred as result of one of these sickly urban deer attacking my small dog, I was reminded that these deer are protected from harvests or removal under our city ordinances. 

Policies need to change

This city urban deer policy, which I believe is backed up by Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife policy, needs to change. That’s especially important given the upcoming election ballot item relating to a city proposal to borrow $75 million for a new Mount Ashland watershed Ashland drinking water reservoir, because a large percentage of the water projected to be needed by our residents in the future is strictly for irrigation of our domestic plants and residential landscaping. 

Growing gardens, feeding deer

Yet, we protect the urban sickly deer population in our town that are every day destroying our landscaping! Why incur huge debt to supply our residents with plenty of future irrigation water while simultaneously protecting the urban deer that are destroying our landscaping and, sometimes, our pets?

And I am sure that there are additional costs incurred every year by some local residents for motor vehicle repair caused by street collisions with these sickly, wandering, destructive creatures.

In short, why borrow $75 million for water for future landscaping that these deer will largely destroy anyway? And these same deer are also threatening and injuring our pets. 

We need a fresh look at our city policies that protect our sickly destructive urban non-wild deer population. 

There is no need to borrow tens of millions of dollars to build up new city water reserves that will be largely used to quench the thirst of our landscape plants, so long as we continue with policies that protect these destructive deer that have the effect of largely nullifying the value of all that additional water!

Conde Cox is an Ashland attorney.

Picture of Jim

Jim


Related Posts...

Viewpoint: Hope and dread and the presidential election

Michael O’Looney: We are all exhausted just thinking about another four years of Trumpian strife and self-glorification or another four years of seeing a faltering though well-intentioned, elderly statesman who simply may no longer have the energy or vision to guide the nation through the perilous times ahead.

Read More »

Writers on the Range: War comes to my small town

Talent councilor Jason Clark: “People all over the world want a negotiated solution that provides peace and justice for both Israelis and Palestinians. More military aid just provokes more resistance and makes a negotiated solution harder to achieve.”

Read More »

Latest posts

‘Telling the American narrative’: SOU to conduct archaeological investigations of historic eastern Oregon logging town this fall

With a newly funded $20,000 grant from the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office, some Southern Oregon University’s Sociology and Anthropology Program students and staff will travel to eastern Oregon this fall to perform archaeological excavations for a logging ghost town that once was home to a diverse community in the early 20th century, including African-American and white loggers.

Read More >

Explore More...

As fall approaches, the Ashland Independent Film Festival volunteers and coordinators prepare for the festival's triumphant return to the Rogue Valley. With a new executive director, the festival is set to involve plenty of new ideas, events and programs while maintaining the classic film festival experience.
With a newly funded $20,000 grant from the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office, some Southern Oregon University’s Sociology and Anthropology Program students and staff will travel to eastern Oregon this fall to perform archaeological excavations for a logging ghost town that once was home to a diverse community in the early 20th century, including African-American and white loggers.
“Don’t let your inability to do everything stop you from doing one thing. And reckoning with racial injustice in the United States is a big task.” That was what Taylor Stewart, Oregon Remembrance Project founder, said in the Ashland Sunrise Project’s latest talk, “Uncovering Difficult Truths.”
A crossword about local news sources. Solve it directly in the article or download a PDF to print. More crosswords under the Culture menu.
The Siskiyou Crest Coalition is hosting a fundraiser Saturday afternoon, July 13, at a private conserved property on the slopes of Mount Ashland owned by Mark Newberger. A butterfly species list is being compiled for the property, which will be the subject of an upcoming article in the North American Butterfly Association magazine and will be a nominee for NABA butterfly garden of the year. 
ashland.news logo

Subscribe to the newsletter and get local news sent directly to your inbox.

(It’s free)

Don't Miss Our Top Stories

Get our newsletter delivered to your inbox three times a week.
It’s FREE and you can cancel anytime.